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June 28, 2016

Full Mojo Rampage: Release Day!

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It’s launch day for Full Mojo Rampage! Get your voodoo on as the game is now available on PS4 and Xbox One in the US and Europe! To celebrate launch day, we have one final blog post that talks about Multiplayer! First, a brand-new trailer, and then – on with the blog post!

Greetings! Rob here again, and this time with an important Full Mojo Rampage public service announcement: friends don’t let friends practice voodoo alone. Well, sometimes they do. Actually, Full Mojo Rampage is pretty damn fun in single-player mode, if I do say so myself. But the point is that you don’t need to play solo, and that’s why there are multiple ways to enjoy the game with friends.

First of all, there are the campaign quests. As I’ve talked about before, there are four story campaigns, and any of them can be played in cooperative multiplayer for up to four players. This is where you can take advantage of different characters’ skills and use complementary parent Loa to form a balanced team to wipe out the enemy, or utilize other tactics. When playing in multiplayer, the random level generation follows the same rules as in single-player mode, but we don’t want the game to be too easy, so the difficulty scales as you add more players: the enemies are tougher, they have more health, and they hit harder.

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Four players can join forces to play through FMR’s campaign mode.

Plus, when you visit a shrine and receive a reward, we don’t want you fighting with each other over who gets the prize, so usually we’ll give out four rewards when there are four players. But how you use them is up to you. Most of the time, everyone will want their own item, but other interesting situations could arise as well. Some of the items you get at shrines are really strong, so if you wanted, you could let one player take all the items and sort of become a powerhouse to lead everyone else to victory. There are lots of tactics you can try out in cooperative multiplayer!

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In cooperative multiplayer mode, enemies hit harder and have more health.

Second, we also have a competitive multiplayer modes for up to eight players. We didn’t feel that we had to reinvent the wheel here, so we stuck with tried-and-true concepts like deathmatch, team deathmatch, and capture the flag, which is especially fun if you play in teams of four against four. My favorite is probably King of Mojo, which is your king-of-the-hill mode, where one character is king, and you have to hunt him down and defeat him. I admit, we didn’t try anything too crazy or experimental, but I think what we have works well and is a lot of fun to play.

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Battle it out in eight-player versus modes such as deathmatch and King of Voodoo.

Whether you’re playing co-op or competitive, single player or multiplayer, campaign mode or endless mode, I think there are a lot of ways to enjoy Full Mojo Rampage. It’s been a tremendous experience making the game, and we’re very excited to finally be bringing it to console audiences with help from Nicalis. I hope you all have a chance to try it out, and on behalf of all of us at Over the Top Games, we’re very appreciative of your support.

June 24, 2016

Full Mojo Rampage: Meet the Loa Part 2

Launch day is almost upon us! Before the weekend we wanted to talk a bit more about the Loa in the game!

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Previously we introduced you to Baron Samedi, Maman Brigitte, Loko, and Ghede – four of the parent Loa that you can enlist to customize your character’s play style in Full Mojo Rampage. Each one brings something different to the table in terms of both abilities and personality, but those are only half of the Loa in the game. Here are the other four!

Erzulie: The flirtatious Erzulie is the Loa of love and beauty, but she also draws strength from tragedy. As your parent Loa, she’ll grant abilities suitable for both support and attack, including an anger field that slows enemies, and boomerang-like tear projectiles that cause damage both coming and going.

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Erzulie’s tear attack will leave enemies crying.

Ogoun: The Loa of war and fire, as well as the patron saint of blacksmiths, Ogoun supports a risky but aggressive play style. With Ogoun as your parent Loa, your attack spells will consume your health, but killing enemies can also restore it, as well as grant bonuses to some other stats.

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If you’re willing to sacrifice your health, Ogoun can unleash some deadly spells.

Lenglensou: Lenglensou is a righteous, wild Loa known for drinking bulls’ blood and having an obsession with sharp objects. He grants enhanced resistance capabilities, including a shield, and you can unleash a swirl of fire. Max out your rampage meter and you’ll transform into a giant, invulnerable bruiser for a limited time.

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Lenglensou is the most defense-focused Loa in the game.

Agaou: A violent force of nature, Agaou is the Loa of thunder, lightning, storms, and earthquakes. Though he’s probably the most powerful Loa, he’s also the riskiest to use. If you choose him as your parent Loa, your health and rampage meters will be one and the same, and though you’ll have a lot of power and increased chance of landing critical hits, doing so is the only way you can only restore health, and the meter drains when you’re not attacking. You can also create a decoy of yourself to confuse enemies.

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Agaou is incredibly strong, but very risky to use.

By the way, early in development we had plans to include nine Loa, but we decided that the initial eight offered a good balance and lots of variety, so we never got around to finishing the last one. Hopefully the descriptions of these eight over have left you eager to try them out and decide which one suits you best once the game hits PS4 and Xbox One.

June 6, 2016

Full Mojo Rampage: Quests from the Underworld

Greetings! Previously we’ve talked about choosing your parent Loa and customizing your character with masks and pins and mojos…but then what do you get to do with him? Lots! In fact, since the game is procedurally generated, you could say there’s an infinite amount of things to do! But for today, let’s take a look at the different campaign quests you can embark on, either alone or in multiplayer teams of up to four players.

In the first quest, Baron Samedi has been partying just a bit too hard, had a little too much to drink, and wouldn’t you know it – he made a teensy mistake and accidentally opened up all of these portals from which enemies are pouring through. Naturally, it’s up to you to find and destroy all the portals.

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The second quest revolves around Maman Brigitte, who’s trying to cast a spell. I won’t go into the details of why she’s trying to cast this spell, but special ingredients are called for, so you’ll have to search the levels and seek out items such as chicken feathers, spider parts, and other things of that nature.

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The third quest is something a bit different. In this one, you need to defeat a powerful voodoo sorcerer, and you can face him right from the beginning of the quest if you’d like. However, he’s very strong, so you’ll be in for a very, very tough fight. Fortunately, you can embark on side quests to defeat his acolytes from which he draws strength. Defeat this acolyte and the sorcerer will lose he health-regenerating capabilities; destroy another one and he won’t be able to throw fireballs. You can conquer as many or as few of the acolytes as you wish, but when you’re ready, it’s time to face the sorcerer and show him who’s boss.

The fourth quest is the most expansive – it’s sort of a final test from the Loa to see if you’re worthy. There are many routes and smaller quests all wrapped up as part of a big overall quest. After you beat one of these smaller quests, multiple additional quest routes become available, and you can choose which path you want to take to proceed. If you don’t like the choices available, you can always return to a previous branch and try an alternate path there to see if those objectives are more to your liking. There are plenty of paths through this one, and lots of variety as well.

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But guess what? Even after you beat all these campaign quests, there’s still more to experience. Once you’ve beaten a quest, you can play it in a higher difficulty level with extra gameplay elements that make it more challenging and change the way you play, such as enemies regenerating health, dropping bombs, inflicting poison, or causing you to slow down when you get hit. There are seven difficulties in all, with the final one basically combining all the previous difficulty modifiers into one super-challenging mode. Actually, the last difficulty mode originally gave the enemies “golden gun” attacks that killed you in one hit…but it was too hard. No one could beat it, not even those of us on the dev team, so we sent that one to the cutting-room floor.

Even without that mode, there should be plenty to sink your teeth into in the campaign quests, especially when you consider the random, roguelike elements you’ll encounter…which I’ll talk more about next time!

June 1, 2016

Full Mojo Rampage hits PS4 and Xbox One on June 28th! New Blog Post: Personalized Voodoo

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Before we get started, we are very happy to announce that Full Mojo Rampage will hit PS4 and Xbox One on June 28th! Check out the trailer below!


Full Mojo Rampage: Personalized Voodoo

One of the major elements we wanted to include in Full Mojo Rampage was for it to be a unique experience every time people play. For any given player, we want it to be different from one game session to the next, and we want each player to have a different experience from other players. That’s one of the reasons why we wanted to emphasize character customization.

As I discussed in previous posts, a big part of that is choosing your parent Loa. There are eight in all, each with different spells and passive abilities, and you can choose a Loa that emphasizes, for example, aggressive attacking, or defense, or healing, or a more balanced play style. There’s only one Loa when you start, but after you’ve unlocked others, the one you go with is up to you, and the choice of Loa defines in part how you’ll play the game.

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 Naturally, your parent Loa plays a big part i customizing your character and determining how you’ll play the game.

But that’s only one way you’re able to personalize your experience. You’re also able to collect and equip a variety of pins to enhance your character and build up your strength – things like more health, dealing extra damage, enhanced stats, and some with special properties. You can select pins that make up for deficiencies of your parent Loa to make your character more balanced, or, better yet, you can play to your Loa’s innate strengths. By combining a parent Loa that possesses good defense with pins that grant extra health and life regeneration, for instance, you can make a tank character that’s very hard to stop. Pins carry over from one game to the next, so once you obtain a new pin, you’ll be able to use it as often as you want, although you’re limited on how many pins you can equip simultaneously.

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You’ll want as many pins as you can get! They all enhance your character in various ways.

In addition to the pins, you’ll also get to acquire and use a huge variety of items called mojos. Unlike pins, mojos don’t carry over between games, so if you die or start a new quest, your mojos will be gone – use ’em while you’ve got ’em! There are more than 100 in all, and how and when you use them will definitely affect how you play the game.

Mojos can do a ton of different things; some simple but useful ones are mojos that boost your basic abilities, such as increasing your critical hit strength or your critical hit chance percentage, or add extra inventory space so you can equip more stuff. Other mojos are more complex, such as ones that spawn allies to help you in battle. There’s one that creates four or five kamikazes with bombs that follow you around, and they’ll charge toward enemies when they see them. Similarly, there’s one called “ghoulify,” and during a certain timeframe it’ll cause every enemy you kill to turn into a ghost that aids you in battle.

There’s also a black hole that sucks enemies toward it (great for crowd control), a disco ball that makes enemies within range start dancing, and rubber chickens you can equip to boost your stats. Sometimes they’re kind of useless, but often they can provide a big boost to a particular stat – what they do is random, so you’ll just have to check and see when you find one! One mojo that’s extremely powerful gives you the power of resurrection. If you die while using this mojo, then you’ll automatically respawn, which otherwise isn’t possible. Its effects only work for a short time, though, so the trick is to activate it just before you think you’re going to perish. With many of the mojos, timing is everything, and that’s especially true with this one.

Of course, I should also mention the voodoo doll mojos. These are equipable mojos that usually boost your stats, but the fun part about them is that they all have these dark, pessimistic descriptions that were written by our early access supporters on Steam, and they’re all named after our supporters as well.

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Express your personality by choosing your favorite mask!

There’s one other important part of personalizing your character, and that’s choosing a mask. The mask is the visually customizable part of your character; unlike the Loa, pins, and mojos, they don’t affect your stats or abilities at all. We wanted this to be something that was purely an aesthetic choice so you could go with the one you like best instead of having to worry about which one was strongest.

There are no right or wrong choices, so feel free to test things out and experiment when Full Mojo Rampage hits PS4 and Xbox One on June 28th!

May 27, 2016

Full Mojo Rampage: Why Voodoo?

Greetings! This is Rob again from Over the Top Games, here to tell you more about the creation of Full Mojo Rampage. One of the unique things about Full Mojo Rampage is its voodoo theme, but it wasn’t always necessarily going to be that way. As I mentioned in my previous post, I’ve always been a huge fan of The Legend of Zelda, so early in development we were considering making an action-adventure game in the same vein.

Our early prototype was in 2D, and it featured a lot of square rooms that were all connected, Zelda-style. The hero had a sword and other weapons like a bow and arrow, and we may have even borrowed a few 8-bit Zelda sprites to create the initial concept. As development continued, though, the visuals transitioned into 3D, and the rectangular environments evolved into something more organic. Around the same time, we decided that, as much as we love the dungeon-and-fantasy motif, it’s something that’s been done a lot of times by a lot of game developers, so that might not be the way to go. So we got the team all together, ordered some pizza, and began brainstorming what direction we should go.

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The NES classic Legend of Zelda was an early inspiration for what would eventually become Full Mojo Rampage.

We considered doing a Greek mythology theme, but we already did that with NyxQuest. It was my brother, Juan, who eventually suggested doing something based on brujeria or voodoo – something a little dark, something different from what we’d done previously. And we all thought about it for a second, and it seemed like the perfect idea. It’s not something that many developers have used in video games, or that’s very frequently represented in pop culture at all.

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Here’s some of the concept art we came up with when we began exploring using a voodoo theme for our game.

We began researching deeper into voodoo and started coming up with concept art, and we ended up turning our focus specifically toward New Orleans voodoo (also called Louisiana voodoo). Voodoo isn’t just one thing; there are several types of voodoo – Haitian, South American, African – and each one is different, but we tried to draw from New Orleans voodoo as much as we could, since that’s the one we were already most familiar with. (Juan was already pretty knowledgable, since he’s pretty obsessed with history and religion.)

The more we learned about voodoo, the more it made sense for a game. The Loa, which are basically spirit gods of voodoo, aren’t just powerful beings; they have a lot of personality, too. They like to drink, they like to smoke, and they like to party, which makes things much more interesting as elements of a game. Baron Samedi, the Loa of the dead and sort of our central character, is an especially notorious partier, so we made him kind of goofy. His wife is Maman Brigitte, another of our Loa, and she’s tired of his debauchery and womanizing. We tried to work as much of that into the game as we could.

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The Loa of voodoo lent themselves well to a unique and interesting video game.

In the end, I think we were able to come with something that was fun and different and a bit dark, and that works really well as a thematic complement to the kind of game that we wanted to create. Thanks for reading, and be sure to check back next time when I discuss the Loa you can use in the game!

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May 25, 2016

Full Mojo Rampage: Meet the Loa Part 1

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One of the fun aspects of Full Mojo Rampage is that you aren’t limited to just one play style. There are eight parent Loa (voodoo gods) in the game that you can pick from to customize your character, and although there’s only one available at the beginning, you’ll be able to unlock the others by collecting medals. You can think of them as character classes; each one has his or her own unique spells and passive abilities to augment your standard projectile attacks, some of which are great for solo play, and some that are best used in multiplayer mode. Here’s a look at four of the parent Loa you can choose from.
Baron Samedi: Baron Samedi is the only Loa available when you start the game. He is a mighty Loa of death and resurrection, but he’s also a known partier and womanizer who loves to drink rum and tell dirty jokes. He offers an evasive dodge and a voodoo bomb, making him a well-rounded choice for your parent Loa. When you fill up your rampage meter, you can summon Baron Samedi himself to join you on the battlefield.

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Baron Samedi’s mix of offensive and defensive moves make him a solid all-around choice.
Maman Brigitte: Like her husband Baron Samedi, Maman Brigitte is a Loa of the dead and could be considered the keeper of the cemetery. She’s an extremely powerful loa, and she sometimes turns that power toward her husband for his affairs and unfaithfulness. Her attacks are fire-based; she lets you surround yourself with flame, shoot out a wave of fire, and protect yourself using bombs.

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Powerful Maman Brigitte has an affinity for fire.
Loko: Loko is the Loa of healing and vegetation, and one of the founders of the voodoo priesthood. He has a strong sprit of justice, and is ready to quickly punish evildoers. Though his health and damage-dealing capabilities aren’t the best, he lets you fire bombs that hurt enemies while healing allies, plus you can bless the earth to gain quicker attacks. His abilities make him a great ally in co-op mode.

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Loko specializes in healing and comes in very handy for co-op play.
Ghede: Ghede is another Loa of death (and also fertility, FYI). He’s a mischievous sort who likes to confuse humans with his mind-control powers. If you choose him as your parent Loa, you’ll use spells to place totems on the ground to either shoot at enemies or provide protection for you and your allies. Placing totems costs points from your rampage meter, but Ghede’s meter generates faster than those of other parent Loa.

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Choose Ghede as you Loa to take advantage of totems.

These four are only half of the Loa that you’ll be able to use in the game. Next time, I’ll give you the rundown on the remaining four: Erzulie, Ogoun, Lenglensou, and the super-destructive Agaou.

May 24, 2016

Ittle Dew 2: Improving Upon the Original

Hey! This is Joel from Ludosity again! Today I wanted to talk about the thought process behind making a sequel…and by that, I mean Ittle Dew 2, of course. Naturally, when you make a sequel, you want to take everything that people loved about the original and make more of it, cut out or fix things that didn’t work, and hopefully add something new so you aren’t just offering the same old thing.

With Ittle Dew 2, we had a pretty good idea of where we wanted to go, and we got some valid critiques of the original game, as well. With the first Ittle Dew, we knew we had made a very good puzzle game, and everybody seemed to like the puzzles. And there’s a very good reason for that – Ittle Dew was originally conceived as a very dense puzzle game, but as we worked on it, it grew and expanded to become an adventure game, complete with combat.

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Fighting is going to be a lot more fluid and varied this time out!

Still, some people have thought that the adventure parts were unfulfilling, or that there was no real need for combat – that those elements felt tacked on. Those are both things that we wanted to address from the beginning with Ittle Dew 2. We updated the visuals from 2D to 3D (more on that in a later post) so we could allow for smoother, 360-degree character movement that would lead to better combat, plus we added an evasive roll that would add more depth to the combat and permit us to include more aggressive enemies.

On the adventure side of things, not only have we made the game world much bigger, but we’ve designed it with nonlinearity in mind, so you can tackle the game’s seven dungeons in any order. And secrets! This time we tried to pack in as many secrets as we could, so we could give you something really rewarding for exploring the island on which the game takes place.

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The game world is a lot bigger than before, which means a lot more to explore and discover!

Of course, there are some things that worked really well in the original, such as restricting ourselves to four active items, each of which is mapped to a face button on the controller. No mucking around in an inventory screen to switch tools and weapons – we wanted to keep things straightforward and focus on using the tools in creative ways rather than loading players up with extra clutter. Naturally, it’s not the same set of tools in Ittle Dew 2, but they’re still upgradable, and our philosophy of creative item use – which includes using items by themselves as well as in combination with one another – hasn’t changed.

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The puzzles and limited inventory were received well in the first Ittle Dew. Those elements will return with even more polish in the sequel!

Hopefully this extra emphasis on fighting and exploration will go a long way towards making Ittle Dew 2 address any issues people had with the original game, and the result will be a bigger, better adventure game that even more people will enjoy.

May 18, 2016

Creepy Castle: Creepy Origins

Zach from Dopterra here again! So, you might be wondering why I decided to make a retro-inspired adventure-RPG starring a giant anthropomorphic moth. Well, as for the moth thing, I’ve just always liked ’em. As for the rest, Creepy Castle started as an idea I cooked up for a 48-hour RPG competition back in 2009. Or was it a game jam? I can’t even remember anymore, but either way, that’s where the concept for the game took root: a retro-looking, side-view, nonlinear, exploration-focused RPG with an action-oriented battle system. I created this early version of Creepy Castle using GameMaker, and a lot of what’s featured in this prototype version will still be found in the final game, including a good chunk of the map design and the locations of enemies and bosses. In fact, some of the original code is still around, too!
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Behold, the original Creepy Castle! It got its start in a 48-hour RPG competition.

After the 48-hour contest, my plan was to flesh out Creepy Castle and turn it into a full-fledged game that was worthy of being released to the public, but one thing led to another and I ended up putting it on the back burner for years until I finally got motivated to commit to the whole indie thing and put the project up on Kickstarter in September 2014. Was the gaming world ready for an RPG with active duels and a cartoony bug protagonist? Apparently it was, because not only did we meet the funding goal, but thanks to everyone’s support, we managed to hit a few stretch goals too! (Yay!)

The new incarnation of Creepy Castle is miles apart from the original version. Despite the fact that some of the aforementioned original content is carrying over, and that the game is still being built with GameMaker, there are tons of new additions, and a lot of what was originally there has been rebuilt with updated code. In the 48-hour version of the game, for instance, there was only one type of battle, but there will be nine in the final game, plus there are substantial new areas, as well as the addition of art for character portraits and cutscenes, and a whole lot more. The story has been rewritten, too, and it’s now presented in a different way – in the form of lore that you encounter as you explore the castle.

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The Fire Dungeon is just one of many, many enhancements made to Creepy Castle since it was first conceived.

Perhaps most importantly, though, is that the original Creepy Castle scenario is just the beginning. There are now four scenarios in all, some of which are bigger than the Creepy Castle portion of the game. The stories in all four scenarios are interconnected, too. And as you might have seen on our Kickstarter page, the game will even feature cameo appearances by some of your other favorite indie characters.

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Creepy Castle wouldn’t be here without the support of our fans on Kickstarter.

For something made in 48 hours, I think the original prototype of Creepy Castle turned out pretty darn good, but it’s only a shadow of what the final game will be. Once it’s complete, Creepy Castle will be exponentially bigger and better in every way, and I’m hopeful you’ll agree that the time invested in all the enhancements has been well spent.

May 17, 2016

Ittle Dew 2: Meet Ittle and Tippsie

Say hello to the protagonists of Ittle Dew 2, Ittle and Tippsie. I guess you could say that Ittle is the true protagonist, given that it’s her name in the game title and all, and she’s the one that you’re controlling, but she probably wouldn’t be the same without her flying-critter sidekick, Tippsie. Or maybe she would. To be honest, we never really cooked up much of a backstory for this duo – they just love to go on adventures, crash onto islands, and beat the crap out of anybody that gets in their way. We wanted characters that were straightforward and not too complicated – this was just one of the ways that we wanted to “trim the fat” compared what you might find in other adventure games.

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One’s a big jerk and the other’s a cynic, but there’s no greater adventuring duo than Ittle and Tippsie!

To be blunt about it, Ittle is an unscrupulous jerk. She might not look like it, but she’s a dumb brute who doesn’t really think things through and is more than willing to resort to violence to get what she wants – and what she wants is to explore, loot the places she visits, and bash anyone who’s unfortunate enough to get in her way over the head. She pretty much wreaks havoc wherever she goes. (And, of course, she’s pretty good with tools like fire swords and force rods and ice rings and dynamite, but we’ll get to those in another post.)

Tippsie might not take as much action as Ittle, but her extreme cynicism makes her more than an match for her companion. Deep down inside she’s probably more good-hearted than Ittle, but you’d probably have to look pretty hard to find it. And if you’re wondering about her name, it’s actually pretty simple. As the thinker of the pair, Tippsie gives tips to help Ittle get through the tougher parts of the adventure. Of course, she may also be a little bit inebriated as well. Tippsie is constantly in need of “health potions,” if you know what I mean, although Ittle doesn’t always allow her to have them.

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Actions speak louder than words, but it’s nice to have a friend to talk to.

The selfish, brutish adventure-seeker and the super-cynical companion…they might not fit the mold of typical game heroes, but that’s the point, and we think you’ll learn to love ’em anyway. We’ll be telling you more about their adventures in Ittle Dew 2 in the near future!

April 4, 2016

Ittle Dew 2: Introduction to Ludosity

Greetings from Sweden! This is Joel from Ludosity; I’m one of the designers of Ittle Dew 2, which we’re bringing to Steam, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One with the help of Nicalis.

If you’ve had a chance to play the original Ittle Dew or any of our other games, like Card City Nights or Bob Came In Pieces (it’s a horrible name, I know), then that’s great! Thanks for the support! For those of you who don’t know us yet, here’s a little bit of background.

Personally, I’ve been a huge gamer ever since the days of the 8-bit NES. One of my favorites? The Legend of Zelda, naturally. That was my go-to game back in the day, and I was mesmerized as I explored its forests and deserts and dungeons. It seemed like there was always something new to discover; it was amazing. Another one of my favorites, for a lot of the same reasons, is Super Metroid, which might be the pinnacle of game design as far as I’m concerned.

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This is our logo. It proves we exist!

Back then I never thought I’d be a game designer, but one day I was criticizing some game — I don’t remember which one — and my girlfriend at the time told me that if I was just going to complain about video games then maybe I should just learn to make better ones myself. And I hadn’t really considered that before, but the more I thought about it, the more it made sense, and so I applied to university to learn about programming and game creation, and I loved it.

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Bob is in pieces. Or, at least, his ship is in pieces, and you need to rebuild it.

I formed Ludosity with a bunch of fellow students back in 2008, and we made a handful of games (like the aforementioned Bob Came In Pieces, which was released on Steam), but team members kept coming and going, and it wasn’t until 2010 or so that we came together to form what I call Ludosity 2.0, which included myself, Daniel (a fantastic level designer who I met at university), Anton (our art director), and Gustav (our programmer). Ever since that core team came together, we’ve been finding our own identity and aesthetic and sense of humor, and we’ve been continuing to create games we want people to enjoy, like the original Ittle Dew (which came out in 2013) and now Ittle Dew 2.

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Ittle Dew was our first stab at a puzzle-filled adventure game.

The Ittle Dew games are top-down adventures born from our love of classics like The Legend of Zelda, hopefully delivering that same sense of wonder and surprise and discovery, but with the Ludosity brand of style and humor and our own take on adventure-y gameplay. Ittle Dew 2 is going to be way, way bigger than the original, with new abilities, revamped graphics, better combat, and much more to explore, and we hope you stick around in the coming days and weeks to get a taste of what we have in store. Thanks for reading…and playing!

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Ittle Dew 2 is on its way to PC, PS4, and Xbox One. Adventure and shenanigans are guaranteed!